Sullivan Goss
AN AMERICAN GALLERY
Celebrating 30 Years
of 19th, 20th and 21stCentury American Art
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REVIEW OUR EXHIBITIONS: NOW SHOWING | COMING SOON | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

Sullivan Goss Exhibitions, Now Showing

Sullivan Goss - An American Gallery presents a variety of exhibitions throughout the year at our Santa Barbara location.


RINGERS: Vintage and Contemporary American Masterworks

February 5, 2015 - May 3, 2015

Sullivan Goss presents a selection of vintage and contemporary art of surpassing merit in its new digs at 11 East Anapamu.

FREDERICK REMAHL, 2015

January 2, 2015 - March 30, 2015

For our fourth show of work from the estate of Swedish born artist Frederick Remahl (1901-1968), Sullivan Goss has brought together a collection that focuses on the artist's watercolors from the 30s and 40s.

Lockwood de Forest Brass Cutouts

January 1, 2015 - December 31, 2015

For the first time in over a century, the copper and brass decorative motifs designed by Lockwood de Forest and taken from Indian art history are presented for sale.

Jean Swiggett: A One Man Renaissance

December 4, 2014 - March 29, 2015

One of four new exhibitions scheduled to open in the month of December, Sullivan Goss presents the debut exhibition from the Estate of Jean Swiggett (1910-1990). Featuring a dozen paintings and drawings created between 1939 and 1981, this exhibition will trace the full arc of the artist's career.

ANDERS ALDRIN: Color Seeking Form

December 4, 2014 - March 29, 2015

One of four new exhibitions scheduled to open in the month of December, Sullivan Goss presents an exhibition from the Estate of the Artist. Color Seeking Form describes Aldrin’s artistic project in terms of the way that color is separated from form and content.