Sullivan Goss
AN AMERICAN GALLERY
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of 19th, 20th and 21stCentury American Art
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Dan Lutz
On Exhibit In Our Main Gallery 1
June 8, 2006 through August 2, 2006

E-Catalog

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Reception

SATURDAY, JUNE 10, 2006
FROM 5 - 7PM
7 EAST ANAPAMU STREET, SANTA BARBARA, CA

A Few Words About This Exhibit

After four years at the Art Institute of Chicago, Dan Lutz (1906-1978) received a scholarship to study in France. The following year, he returned to Chicago and married Dorothy Best. They moved out to Los Angeles in 1932, where the artist finished his degree at the University of Southern California.

To support his new family, Lutz took a teaching position at USC and later at Chouinard. During this early period, the artist’s rare sensitivity to the plight of ordinary Americans was manifest in spectacular paintings whose brushwork borrowed equally from Ashcan artist, Robert Henri, and from fellow California Scene painter, Rex Brandt.

Gradually, Lutz strayed from the Regionalist sensibility. Where so many of his contemporaries in California left Regionalism for the geometric formality of Cubism or Constructivism, Lutz moved instead towards the rhythm, energy, and rich painterly surface of the Abstract Expressionists. His later paintings, so often overlooked by scholars, testify to the originality and brilliance of one of the West Coast’s most forward looking artists.

About the Artist

To learn more about this artist, click here.